Showing 13–21 of 21 results

RIVA COSARO
RIVA COSARO

The Corsaro, based on the AR Sport motorboat designed by Carlo Riva in 1946, entered production in 1950. Although only forty were built, it set the scene for later Riva models with its elegant lines and tapering stern. Ranging in length from 4.8 to 5.65 metres, the two-seat boat was fitted with a range of different engines over its lifetime. Only one is known to survive

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RIVA FLORIDA
RIVA FLORIDA

The Florida design, first penned in 1952, was another enduring classic in the Riva range, as well as the most popular of the wooden boats to be produced on the shores of Lago d’Iseo. Between 1952 and 1969 1,137 boats were built, comprising 426 normal Floridas and 711 super Florida slightly larger and more powerful.
Named after the American state most closely associated with water-skiing, the Florida design features a cockpit and a large sun-bed astern, divided by a bridge of mahogany deck, filleted with maple. Early models were fitted with Chris Craft engines, followed by Chrysler and latterly Riva’s own 220 hp unit, built around a Crusader V8.

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RIVA RAMA
RIVA RAMA

Craftsmanship, design and unmatchable quality have been the hallmarks of Riva since the company’s founding in 1842 in Sarnico, Italy, one of Italy’s great boat-building centers. It’s there that Pietro Riva built his first “Riva,” known for quality craftsmanship and performance ahead of its time. By the 1930s, the business was managed by Pietro’s grandson, Serafino, under whose guidance the company became known for manufacturing small racing boats, which Serafino himself raced. Not content to remain in this niche, the Riva family increased its line to include boats built as much for pleasure as for speed. By the 1950s, the Riva name, under the leadership of Pietro’s grandson, Carlo, Riva became a symbol of quality, elegance, speed and, most notably, wealth. As a result, Riva gained worldwide fame as the luxury boat of choice for kings and queens, matinee idols, corporate titans, entrepreneurs and jet-setters worldwide

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RIVA TRITON
RIVA TRITON

The Tritone was the most important model in the Riva stable, the largest and most expensive boat, and the only to be equipped with twin engines. Its size, power and long range (thanks to large fuel tanks) made it an ideal boat for sea-cruising, and it did much to forge Riva’s reputation in the Mediterranean. Evolving from the BQ 69 designed in 1950 it was given its name in 1953. Its hull design drew on the Corsaro, with the addition of a second row of seats in the cockpit, behind which the stern area was completely decked and used as a sun bed.

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SUNGLIDER
SUNGLIDER
The motor yacht SUNGLIDER is a 36 m 120 (foot) good sized composite boat which was created at Isa (International Shipyards Ancona) and devised by Isa Yachts and Andrea Vallicelli. Sleeping 10 passengers and 5 qualified crew, motor yacht SUNGLIDER was formerly 120.3 which was her project name or actual name. Launched by 2006 the recent internal styling demonstrates the seasoned experience in the designing of Cristiano Gatto Design Team.
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SUNSEEKER
SUNSEEKER

Conceived as a yacht to appeal to yachtsmen of many tastes, the Sunseeker Predator 80 has sleek lines and an aggressive stance give the Predator power to draw the eye, but the details may be enough to keep it there. The standard layout will accommodate eight guests in four staterooms (plus a crew cabin in the stern that could easily be used for guests). The twin 16V 2000 M14 MTUs give the Predator a top speed of 45 knots.

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TYPHOON
TYPHOON

The boat, Typhoon, was designed back in 1929 by George Crouch. The Typhoon’s origin began with Edsel Ford, who was an avid raceboat enthusiast. Knowing the background, and seeing the famous Teaser speedboat in action, Edsel Ford wanted a new fast boat just like it. He contacted the yard that built the Teaser and had an exact copy built, naming it the Typhoon. The Typhoon was a large brute, measuring in at 40′ in length with a 2000 cu. in. Wright Typhoon engine, she was made for racing. Edsel Ford never used it as a pure racer, however. His primary use for the boat was as a commuter speedboat between the Ford factory and his home in Lake St. Claire. In 1941, Ford sold it to Howard Hughes who kept it running during the war years, but soon sold it after the war. The Typhoon then went through a series of owners over the next few years ending up in Kentucky. Then in the late sixties, her current owners had her shipped from Kentucky to Seattle Washington. In the late 1960’s, at Bryants Marina in Washington, the boat that was docked next to the Typhoon caught fire. The fire raged out of control, and soon engulfed the Typhoon. The Typhoon was a total loss

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